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Italian and American Cane Corso - differences
 
Quote · 3653 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
Whenever any breed is moved from their homeland and becomes established in another land with different cultures, laws and social nuances some change is inevitable. In the case of the Cane Corso and for the information of our members, please share your thoughts on these differences or smiliarities between the American and Italian Cane Corso. [list] [*]Temperament [*]Working ability (you decide what working means to you) [*]Size and structure [/list:u] In the [url=http://www.molosserdogs.com/modules.php?name=Encyclopedia&op=content&tid=543]standard[/url] it says [quote] Today the Cane Corso makes an excellent guard dog, extremely loyal to it's family and quite aloof with strangers. He has a very protective nature and yet is able to discern friend from foe. [/quote] What does being aloof with strangers mean to you?
Quote · 3646 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
Hi! I'm not sure I can express my thoughts about this in english, but I'll try.. Since I'm not very familiar with the American Cane I can't see the differences or similarities, but I can tell you about the Corsos I have. [list]Temperament[/list:u] My CC:s are very loyal to our family, but not at all aloof with strangers (except one of our 4 months old females). Their guarding insticts are well developed and I can be sure there's something outside our land whenever they bark and growl. Overall easygoing familymembers, who rest when nothing happens and are very energic in the forrest or whereever we go. [list]Working ability[/list:u] I haven't trained them to something in particular, but it doesn't matter what you tell them to do, they will do their best and a little more to please you. [list]Size and Structure[/list:u] Well all my CC:s have been within the FCI-standard, eg not over 70 cm in height and not more than 50 kg in weight. Best regards, Suedicca's Kennel in Sweden
Quote · 3473 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
Aloof with strangers means they will pretty much ignore strangers. Like a lab is very affectionate towards strangers and immediately accepts them into the home, a corso won't be as interested in making friends with them. Ignore isn't really accurate though, as they might keep an eye on the stranger and they certainly won't ignore the stranger if he/she becomes aggressive or poses a threat of some kind. That's why you need the word aloof, I suppose. Basically they'll act like they couldn't care less about the stranger. Won't be friendly or nasty to them. Untill they get a reason to be either friendly or nasty. I have a question, what work was the cane corso designed for? I mean originally? I know people employ them for varying tasks now but why did the italians create this mastiff? Was it a boar dog? cattle dog? guard dog? All of the above?
Quote · 3473 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
[quote=Tonedog]I have a question, what work was the cane corso designed for? I mean originally? Was it a boar dog? cattle dog? guard dog? All of the above?[/quote] the right answer is "all of the above, AND EVEN MORE" :D please,visit the interesting website www.cane-corso.it , and specifically in [url=www.cane-corso.it/storianotizieimportanti.htm]this[/url] page look at "impieghi di una volta"!(also english version)
Quote · 3158 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
The corso imo is still a breed in development. The main differences I have found bewteen the two lines are: Temperment: I have found that both lines temps can very, I have seen extremely aggressive dogs, both dog and social. Timid dogs, and totally indifferent. Each corso is different Confirmation/Structure: In the past white on the toes was frowned upon. Now you can see corso with a full white chest, quarter white on the feet. The bite of the dogs vary as well. Scissors bite, reverse scissors, under shots as well. When I first got involved with the Corso I never saw any undershot dogs. The ones I did notice them on were the italian import. The setting of the eyes are a major difference I have noticed. Many imports have boxer/bulldog type eyes, almost pertruding. Size--is one of the biggest problems I have with the breed. My first Corso comes from old italian stock, she is what I call the old blooded corso. Many, Many foundation dogs linedbreed in her pedigree, e.g. Cocomo, Nero and so on. Throughout the years I have seen the dogs continaully lose size and bone mass. I have also noticed the loss of forehead mass as well. Working ability--is up in there. It will depend on temperment which varies widely within the breed. They are capable of doing most task if the right dog is selected. Basically the differences within the breed is due to human intervention with each group saying it ideal corso is the only one.
Quote · 3158 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
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Quote · 3158 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
I agree Wolf. All the different names, to me translate to one dog with different names for different strains of dogs...e.g. pitbull--eli, jeep, colby.
Quote · 3158 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
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Quote · 3158 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
I do still agree with you, my explanation was more geared to the corsos/corso type dogs of Italy. The dogs in Canada, United States and Europe do share a common lineage, whether from the past dogs or current crosses. I do not see much difference between the corsos from each respective nation. I see the variety in each of these nations corsos. I think now many maybe resorting to panicing in order to force a unformity in conformation, its a strange coicidence that this happening right when the Akc is providing foundation stock service for the American Corsos.
Quote · 3154 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
Where is the proof that the so called "American Corso" is not the same as that found in Italy? I have heard this too, but many specimens found overseas and in American resemble each other, and some do not. Isn't some variation in working breeds expected? But to say they are different breeds? Is this train of thought correct? Are there Italian Corsos, American Corsos, and this new Canadian Corso Pugliese thing? Cuz worldwide fanciers of the breed only know one dog, the Cane Corso, not an American or Italian Corso. Putting "American" or "Italian" in front of the word "Corso" usually denotes whether the dog was bred in Italy or America. I have been researching the Corso for years now and have yet to find credible evidence of the "Ameican" dogs impuirty.
Quote · 3154 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
There is a difference between American-[u]bred[/u] Corsos and American-[u]made[/u] Corsos.
Quote · 3152 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
To me personally the phrase "aloof with strangers" means the Cane Corso, or any and all being's be that animal and/or human for that matter, that are considered to be aloof, are simply physically and emotionally detached. Taking the example of a Cane Corso, or any other breed of dog that is considered to be aloof, to me would mean that he/she would observe a stranger from a distance but always within view. Therefore, declining and refusing to partake in any invitation whatsoever on behalf of any stranger thats pertinent to any acts of and/or suggestions of friendliness. No amount of coaxing or friendly banter on account of any stranger will allow for themselves to put in a situation where upon they will be completely at ease in the company of such persons. They may appear to be any and all of these; Casual, Detached, Distant, Incurious, Indifferent, Laid-back, Reserved, Stand-offish, Unapproachable, Uninterested, Unresponsive, Unfriendly, Unsociable, Withdrawn, Disassociated, Conceited, Disdainful, Contemptuous, Impassive, Unpreturbed, Unemotional, Unexcitable, Unflappable, Unmoved, Unruffled, Lackadaisical, Unwelcoming, Hostile, Icy, Impertinent, Impudent, Insolent, Averse and Derisive. However they will always be at the ready to dispose of any threat or foreboding situation that a stranger may place apon him/ her and their extended human family, and in any way that they see necessary to counter act any such foreseeable provocation. And to me that is the ideal. If I could have a dog that was mindful of his own business when it comes to strangers and only interfered when given the ok or when absolutlely necessary I'd be wrapped. As I previously stated this is only how I construe the phrase "aloof with strangers", and how I believe in my opionion an aloof dog should act. Having said that I am by no means an expert on the Cane Corso, I am in fact an amateur when it comes to this breed. They're only very new here in Australia, hence I do not know if this is how a Cane Corso's temperment is or should be. I would love to know if I am on the right track though.
Quote · 3152 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
Truely, there is no difference between any of the corsos. Many of pedigrees will show italian dogs, american dogs, canadian dogs and so on. I visited several kennels over in Italy and here in the states, I saw the same variety. If everyone really wanted to unify the breeds then they would all work together to refine the standards. Egos are in play here.
Quote · 3152 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
My observation shows two differences. These differences will exist in any subgroup and is not to be considered as exclusive. 1. The American dog is more mastiffy - bigger, more bone, wider body.. 2. The Italian dog has a sharper temperament. Incidentally, it depends to a great extent on the line. Since there are many Italian bred Cane Corsi in the USA it is probably difficult to ascertain from whence they came without first-hand knowledge of the dogs.
Gary
Quote · 3152 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
In my opinion if the dog is going to carry the mastiff name then they should be large, well boned. I believe the temperment in the corsi in the US is much different. They range greatly within the breed. I have seen many corsi in italy, they do seem to have a sharper temperment, that maybe due to cross breeding. I know I know, that statement is contreversial but I have witnessed it first hand. Nothing wrong with that, but its just my observation. What I don't like are the slender corsi from Italy.
Quote · 2986 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
I am just wondering when vets will start performing LIPO SUCTION on dogs :idea: ?... ~Amber
Quote · 2985 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
well i'm not a american line fan at all but i'll try to describe it as objective as i humanly can lol Temperment: i never meat in eye or asked how the temperments of american lines but i do now well the italian lines. from what i saw so far they can be very friendly dogs to family and strangers if they were exposed from young age propaply, dogs that weren't trought this usually grew up to be very agressive, dominate dogs or very fearfull, much as any breed Working ability: never tested by myself an american line but i do have some friends that own such dogs. i did saw more titles dogs in US ( and i speak schh, IPO and herding titles ) than in other places. many of those US dogs usually had alot of italian blood in them or were imported from Italy and places like that. the male i have a female from ( Touno) did produced some great studs with schh titles and as much as schh can't tale to much about a dog it does say about the prey drive and wilingns to work. the same i saw from the father and granfather ( half brothers) of my bigger girls who also produced some CAL and schh dogs so as much as i saw from the italian line without knowing well the american lines i do say the italian ones have more work potantial ( sp) Size and Structure: now here remmber i'm not here to insulte anybody from any side so please take it easy as i saw the american line do have alot of size usually and good bodys, big and strong bones but, and here i have a strong BUT, the heads, the head is THE most important thing first seen in CC, i never so far saw a pure american line that had a good corect head, they always have heads to short and wied or way to long and pointy, sorry but this isn't a CC head at all. hope nobody offended to eatier side :) more to that from now any Italian ch must also own a CAL2, not to much of working title but it's alredy somthing
Quote · 2985 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
I have been into the Corso's for over 8 years, I still two Corso's and co-own several more. When I first started researching the breed, I never found any undershot dogs, all the dogs I have seen in the past had minimal white. They had deep set eyes which did not potrude. Now I have seen undershot dogs, looking very bully, protruding eyes, Like a boxer, a large amount of white, ( dogo ). Whether american or european both sides have crossed dogs. I found that the past corso's of the U.S. had much more type and better working temp. We have to remember that this is a working breed. Sharp temps are welcomed and are needed for true working dogs.
Quote · 2985 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
[quote=bullmol242]I have been into the Corso's for over 8 years, I still two Corso's and co-own several more. When I first started researching the breed, I never found any undershot dogs, all the dogs I have seen in the past had minimal white. They had deep set eyes which did not potrude. Now I have seen undershot dogs, looking very bully, protruding eyes, Like a boxer, a large amount of white, ( dogo ). Whether american or european both sides have crossed dogs. I found that the past corso's of the U.S. had much more type and better working temp. We have to remember that this is a working breed. Sharp temps are welcomed and are needed for true working dogs.[/quote] Good points. I dont think you can generalise and say "the Italians do this and the Americans do that". There are serious, hard working breeders on both sides of the pond and also the not so serious that try to put their own twist on the breed and do not really care how the dogs of the past were or try to preserve the breed. Also, do not forget all the good programmes in northern Europe, South America and other parts of the world. Its not only an Italy/US thing.
Quote · 2985 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
http://www.canecorsoworkingclub.com/index.html A lot of good US dogs (many with Italian lines also) there! For the better of the breed, we should try to set the differences aside and use the best dogs, no matter if its Italian, US or whatever!
Quote · 2835 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
[quote=bullmol242]I have been into the Corso's for over 8 years, I still two Corso's and co-own several more. When I first started researching the breed, I never found any undershot dogs, all the dogs I have seen in the past had minimal white. They had deep set eyes which did not potrude. Now I have seen undershot dogs, looking very bully, protruding eyes, Like a boxer, a large amount of white, ( dogo ). Whether american or european both sides have crossed dogs. I found that the past corso's of the U.S. had much more type and better working temp. We have to remember that this is a working breed. Sharp temps are welcomed and are needed for true working dogs.[/quote] Many of the dogs from old school breeders like Cosmo Verdino where undershot and also had plenty of white on the toes and chest. Sometime white socks on the feet and penis sheeth. Those dogs go back farther than 8 years ago.
Quote · 2835 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
I would like to know what "old school" breeders produced overshot bites in the Corso????????????????????????????????? 8O
Quote · 2826 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
I was staying on a polish kennel last weekend, and the owner showed me an old corso lady. las vegas line. She was 11 years old and had the size of a big amstaff. Her nose was quite long and the face didnt say corso in any way. More like a bullterrier kind of head. The breeder claimed, that many of the old dogs from kennel las vegas, was american bandogs. It did made sence when I saw the dog. I have heard that before, but this is the first time I se a corso, that could look like a bandogmix
Quote · 2602 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
Even in Europe, you could get fake Corsi, or Corsi that look like another breed. I've seen a blue and tan (Rottweiler colour but blue) win once ! The first big champion in the Netherlands had a wrong colour too (slight sadle colouring). A lot of them look more like boxers or bullmastiff nowadays.
Quote · 2590 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 
[quote=Wolf]Add to the stew the Italian Corso Ortognato and its Canadian version named Corso Pugliese and you have even more variety in the group. Not to mention original regional breeds of the Cane e Presa Italiano type, many of which are on their way of dissapearing and some that have been lost due to the popularity of the Cane Corso programmes...[/quote] Good point. Being that dogs are like people, and other living creatures, regional variations occurs and consistency is nebulous thing - of course "regionalism" can also have its variations. Really, the various "breeds" native to So. Italy which are being collected into the Cane Corso, aren't being lost, IMO. Rather, in a way, they're being preserved. What's more important is that Cane Corso breeders are being consistent in their use of So. Italian dogs and producing dogs fitting of their original purpose, even if those specific purposes won't be fulfilled.
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