Gary_Sicard

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Hi Mo, welcome to the site. Hope you like it here.

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Channels are automagically created by users of the site simply by putting the hashtag "#" in front of a word. For example if I type it will automatically create a Channel called Ilovedogs. You can uses this to promote and aggregate contents on the site. Give it a try next time you post something.

Also, you can use the "@" feature to directly indicate someone in a post for example - ?@Desiree? joined in 2003 and ?@eliteguardianpresa? has some awesome @presa_canario :)

Cheers. Gary

Thank you for sharing this information.

yeahhhhhh - having some fun in the snow. Fantastic photo.

Your dogs are loving the snow Jess. All we got here in Texas is the cold. lol... bring us some white stuff.. snow I mean.

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In this group we hope to attract, retain and have detailed discussions about primitive and aboriginal dogs both extinct and existing. This group will rely on members' contribution and active discussion as we delve into the origins, functions, and characteristics of the progenitors of some of our favorite breeds. Join us and share what you know or just lurk and learn.

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Herding dogs are trained to work with livestock. There are many ways to train a herding dog, but the most common method is to use positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement involves rewarding the dog for good behavior, such as following commands and staying focused on the task at hand. The first steps you need to take if you have a brand new herding dog or puppy are to teach them to walk calmly on a leash, and to teach them basic commands such as “sit,” “lay down,” “stay,” and “come”.

Once your dog has mastered these basic commands, you can start teaching them more advanced commands such as “go by,” “come bye,” and “away”. You can also use tools such as a staff, a lead, and a hat to guide and correct the dog. There are many resources available online and in books that can help you train your herding dog. Some popular resources include the book “Dogs of the Shepherds: A Review of the Pastoral Breeds” by David Hancock, and the video “Training Your Dog to Work Livestock: Balance and Commands” by BWR Stockdog Training.

Remember, training a herding dog takes time and patience, but with the right approach, you can have a well-trained and obedient dog that will be a valuable asset on your farm or ranch

Reposted Gary_Sicard's comment.

Anyone interested in the formations of breeds and the influences of various genes and locations must read this article. Knowing that it is a scholarly article that is well written and researched may give it some standing. I read it and liked it. It seems that the more we know the less we know. :)

Anyone interested in the formations of breeds and the influences of various genes and locations must read this article. Knowing that it is a scholarly article that is well written and researched may give it some standing. I read it and liked it. It seems that the more we know the less we know. :)

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I completely agree with your comment. Good ownership and discipline pays off in the long term with better dogs and reputation.

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Training your dog to come when called is an essential skill that can help keep your dog safe and under control. Here are some steps to follow when training your dog to come:

  1. Start indoors: Begin by training your dog indoors in a quiet, low-distraction environment. Call your dog’s name and say “come” in a happy and enthusiastic tone of voice. When your dog comes to you, reward them with a treat and praise.
  2. Add distance: Once your dog is consistently coming to you indoors, start practicing in a larger space or outdoors. Gradually increase the distance between you and your dog, and continue to reward them when they come to you.
  3. Add distractions: As your dog becomes more reliable at coming to you, start practicing in more distracting environments. You can use toys or treats to get your dog’s attention and encourage them to come to you.
  4. Use a long leash: If your dog is still learning to come when called, you can use a long leash to help keep them under control. This will allow you to give your dog more freedom while still being able to reel them in if necessary.
  5. Be consistent: Consistency is key when training your dog to come when called. Always use the same command, and reward your dog every time they come to you. With time and practice, your dog will learn to associate the “come” command with positive experiences and will come to you reliably.

Remember to be patient and keep training sessions short and positive. With time and practice, your dog will learn to come when called and will be a happier and safer companion. Good luck! 🐾

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Dermatitis in dogs can be caused by a variety of factors, including allergies, infections, and parasites. Treatment for dermatitis will depend on the underlying cause of the condition. Some common treatments include:

  1. Identification and avoidance of the allergen: If the dermatitis is caused by an allergy, identifying and avoiding the allergen can help reduce symptoms.
  2. Medicated baths: Medicated shampoos can help soothe the skin and reduce inflammation.
  3. Antibiotics and antifungals: If the dermatitis is caused by a bacterial or fungal infection, antibiotics or antifungal medications may be prescribed.
  4. Supplements: Omega-3 and Omega-6 essential fatty acids can help improve skin health.
  5. Anti-itch medications: For more serious symptoms, anti-itch medications might be appropriate.

It’s important to consult with a veterinarian to determine the underlying cause of your dog’s dermatitis and develop an appropriate treatment plan. I hope this information helps!

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